Math conversation starters

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

The padlet.com site has a wonderful range, with real life examples of how math is woven into our society. Great starters for conversations with your students.

Read all about it: HERE

Math Games

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Ali, a math teacher who publishes on Medium, shares his choice of 7 very nice math games. They are not all perfect for children with Dyscalculia but they all help with understanding math and in the area of edu – tainment they all fall on the edu side of things.

Read all about it: HERE

Move to remember

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

From the LDA newsletter we bring this wonderful story about ways to more effectively have children remember their math:

In their book The Kinesthetic Classroom, Traci Lengel and Mike Kuczala cite studies that show us how learning certain concepts through movement is efficient and long-lasting.

Movement gives learning experiences something fresh and new, which the brain likes. This novelty helps keep the attention of the students, making their learning efficient. It’s been my experience over years of using movement in math class that even those students who are timid and reluctant to participate at first are nevertheless paying attention and are interested in what’s going on around them. Their brains are still activated.

Read all about it: HERE

‘Smart’ versus ‘doing great’

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

New research shows that students who are known for being smart have a tendency to be more dishonest and cheat!

Read all about it: HERE

Rekenrek all over the world

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Rekenrek, originally invented by the Dutch mathematician Adrian Treffers. Being native Dutch, Dr Schreuder is available to train you and your staff in the use of the Rekenrek in the classroom or when tutoring children.

Read all about it: HERE

Subtraction without regrouping

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

More ways to learn the numbers 1-10

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Some great research just got published:

In this paper, we present a way of describing variation in young children’s learning of elementary arithmetic within the number range 1–10. Our aim is to reveal what is to be learnt and how it might be learnt by means of discerning particular aspects of numbers. The Variation theory of learning informs the analysis of 2184 observations of 4- to 7-year-olds solving arithmetic tasks, placing the focus on what constitutes the ways of experiencing numbers that were observed among these children

Read all about it: HERE

Adding a pathway to mathematical success

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

According to the Pathways to Mathematics model [LeFevre et al. (2010), Child Development, Vol. 81, pp. 1753–1767], children’s cognitive skills in three domains—linguistic, attentional, and quantitative—predict concurrent and future mathematics achievement. We extended this model to include an additional cognitive skill, patterning, as measured by a non-numeric repeating patterning task.

Read all about it: HERE

Bringing math in your child’s life

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

We all know how important it is to show your child that math is everywhere around you and not invented by their teacher to make their life difficult. Well in our link for today some tips on how to bring math in your child’s life by the National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) 

Read all about it: HERE

Base ten blocks connected with abstract numbers

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

In this new study children who exhibited knowledge of the connections between the base-ten-blocks and written number symbols had higher posttest and transfer test scores relative to children who did not exhibit knowledge of these connections.

Read all about it: HERE

Part Part Whole and finger patterns

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Findings from a study of 5-to-6-year-old children’s ways of structuring part-part-whole relations using finger patterns.

Read all about it: HERE

Supporting your twice exceptional child

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

They are special, the children who have both a learning disability and outstanding skills in another topic. The question is how to effectively support them?

Read all about it: HERE

Shake a Stick at times tables

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

From the UK a new approach to learn times tables. Times tables are important and there are many ways people try to teach them. This idea centers around a stick that they use to explain the tables and groups of multiplications that fit together. They also have a youtube channel to support the method. When you have tried many methods, here is just one extra you can try.

Read all about it: HERE

Help your child counting

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Your child is learning new things every day. And just as you can help them with their language and reading, there are also ways you can boost your preschooler’s number skills.

This is especially important as learning to count is SO much more than just one, two, three

Read all about it: HERE

An IEP with the student as central point

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Student-centered IEP meetings can be held at any developmental level – even if the student isn’t attending the meeting. It’s up to district leadership to determine if student involvement in the IEP meeting is developmentally appropriate. If the student doesn’t attend the meeting, they can still be involved in the IEP process.

Read all about it: HERE

Parental involvement in math

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Here is some research about what parental involvement with math (homework) can do with their children’s math achievement. Here is the short of the conclusions:

Parents’ involvement in homework (vs. activities) was more affectively negative (d = .34), particularly among parents low in self-efficacy (d = .23). The more affectively negative parents’ involvement, particularly in homework, the poorer children’s later math motivation and achievement (βs = −.09 to .20).

Read all about it: HERE

Do math apps really work?

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

A very comprehensive review of math apps for small children with recommendations about design and content for parents and teachers to look out for.

part of their summary:

Overall, these results demonstrate that many
of the commercial educational apps for young
children that are categorised as ‘maths’, are not
necessarily reflective of best practices in app
content and design.
58 Can Maths Apps Add Value to Young Children’s Learning?
Most apps did not comprehensively capture
all areas of mathematical development,
nor did they adequately include features of
personalisation, such as explanatory feedback
and programmatic personalisation, which
this research has shown maximises children’s
outcomes in app-based learning. This
demonstrates the limited options for identifying
high-quality maths apps currently available for
parents and teachers and highlights the need
to improve the meaningful categorisation of
educational apps on the app stores to facilitate
parent and teacher choice.

Read all about it: HERE

Dyscalculia Assessment development

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Researchers lead by Flavia H. Santos set out to develop a Developmental Dyscalculia Assessment:

Developmental Dyscalculia (DD) signifies a failure in representing quantities, which impairs the performance of basic math operations and schooling achievement during childhood. The lack of specificity in assessment measures and respective cut-offs are the most challenging factors to identify children with DD, particularly in disadvantaged educational contexts. This research is focused on a numerical cognition battery for children, designed to diagnose DD through 12 subtests. 

Santos, F.H.; Ribeiro, F.S.; Dias-Piovezana, A.L.; Primi, C.; Dowker, A.; von Aster, M. Discerning Developmental Dyscalculia and Neurodevelopmental Models of Numerical Cognition in a Disadvantaged Educational Context. Brain Sci. 202212, 653. https://doi.org/10.3390/brainsci12050653

Read all about it: HERE

Research Highlights

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

In our link for today a very useful meta study done by Bert De Smedt.

  • Highlights
  • Domain-specific and domain-general factors correlate with math to a similar extent-
  • Associations are similar in struggling learners (dyscalculia)-
  • Emerging evidence suggest bidirectionality between mathematics and its predictors-
  • Theory-informed longitudinal
  • studies are needed to understand mechanisms

Read all about it: HERE

Developing Spatial Reasoning Skills

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Research indicates that spatial reasoning skills correlate to children’s early achievement in math and “strongly predict” who will pursue STEM careers later in life.

In our link for today PBS shares a few ways to help your child developing those important skills.

Read all about it: HERE

After Sudoku now Hidato

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

A wonderful way to be creative with numbers without having to do much calculations is the Hidato puzzle. In our link for today an explanation of what they are and a supply to try it yourself.

Read all about it: HERE

Math is about thinking

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Rather than debating whether “discovery learning” or “the basics” are most important for children, more attention is needed to support the development of children’s thinking about quantities and space.

A considerable amount of research now shows that children’s success in school depends on the extent to which parents and educators encourage them to think mathematically in the years before they enter Grade 1.

Read all about it: HERE

Dyscalculia treatment

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

A short article with the highlights of what helps as a dyscalculia treatment. They also have links to suggested accommodations for in the classroom.

Read all about it: HERE

Brain game

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

A student from Dundee has developed a great game that you can play in the classroom and that teaches children about neurodiversity.

It focuses on autism, ADHD, dyslexia, dyscalculia, neurological tic disorder, sensory processing disorder, epilepsy and dyspraxia.

Players compete against one another, answering questions about the neurodiverse conditions for the chance to move their counter ahead on the colourful board.

Keira designed the game as part of her final-year studies at Dundee University’s Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design.

Read all about it: HERE

TikTok and Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Also on the popular video sharing network TikTok we see all kinds of contributors sharing their thoughts and experiences with dyscalculia.

Read all about it: HERE

Improve number sense

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Great article in the link for today about ways to improve number sense

the short:

Give students concrete experience with numbers along with the more abstract lessons.

Teach the skills until they master them.

Teach them to talk about math, write about math, and understand words relating to math. Have conversations with them about mathematics, using the new terms.

Read all about it: HERE

Mandatory Multiplication table test

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

The UK is introducing a mandatory multiplication tables test in primary school They already have tests for numeracy, literacy, communication and language. When done right this would be an early screening for dyscalculia, should the US follow?

Read all about it: HERE

Visible math

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Our link for today is about making math more visible and a research project underway to explore ways by which teachers can change their math lessons to be more visible.

Read all about it: HERE