When your student fails a test

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Children with Dyscalculia will have this experience more often than children without learning disabilities. Jinnifer Findley brings a great article to help out here and has a whole process you could follow.

Read all about it: HERE

How to use Cuisenaire rods and why

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

If you are ever wondering how and why to work with the popular colored little rods, read the book in the link for today from the association of teachers of mathematics. It covers much of the history and uses.

Read all about it: HERE

The International Science and Evidence Based Education (ISEE) Assessment 

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

The International Science and Evidence Based Education (ISEE) Assessment is an initiative of the UNESCO Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Education for Peace and Sustainable Development (MGIEP), and is its contribution to the Futures of Education process launched by UNESCO Paris in September 2019. In order to contribute to re-envisioning the future of education with a science and evidence based report, UNESCO MGIEP embarked on the first-ever large-scale assessment of knowledge of education.

The overall goal of the ISEE Assessment is to pool multi-disciplinary expertise on educational systems and reforms from a range of stakeholders in an open and inclusive manner, and to undertake a scientifically robust and evidence based assessment that can inform education policy-making at all levels and on all scales. Its aim is not to be policy prescriptive but to provide policy relevant information and recommendations to improve education systems and the way we organize learning in formal and non-formal settings. It is also meant to identify information gaps and priorities for future research in the field of education.

Read all about it: HERE

There are no silver bullet solutions

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

The quick-fix solutions promised by silver bullet interventions can distract from the more localized and complicated solutions schools really need, say experts.

Read all about it: HERE

Fitter bodies have larger grey matter

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Researchers from the University of Granada (UGR) have proven, for the first time in history, that physical fitness in children may affect their brain structure, which in turn may have an influence on their academic performance.

More specifically, the researchers have confirmed that physical fitness in children (especially aerobic capacity and motor ability) is associated with a greater volume of grey matter in several cortical and subcortical brain regions.

In particular, aerobic capacity has been associated with greater grey matter volume in frontal regions (premotor cortex and supplementary motor cortex), subcortical regions (hippocampus and caudate nucleus), temporal regions (inferior temporal gyrus and parahippocampal gyrus) and the calcarine cortex. All of those regions are important for the executive function as well as for learning, motor and visual processes.

Read all about it: HERE

Let teens sleep some longer

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

A later school start time could mean teens are more likely to get adequate amounts of sleep, according to Penn State researchers.

In a national study of urban teenagers, researchers found that high school start times after 8:30 a.m. increased the likelihood that teens obtained the minimum recommended amount of sleep, benefiting their overall health and well being.

“Teens starting school at 8:30 a.m. or later were the only group with an average time in bed permitting eight hours of sleep, the minimum recommended by expert consensus,” said lead author Orfeu Buxton, associate professor of biobehavioral health at Penn State. “Later school start times were associated with later wake times in our large, diverse sample.”

Read all about it: HERE

Adjustments for Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

The SPELD NSW (short for Supporting children and adults with specific learning difficulties) shares this wonderful resource with adjustments you can make for children who have dyscalculia.

Read all about it: HERE

More baby math

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

New research found that from as young 14 months, babies who hear counting realize that counting indicates quantity.

Read all about it: HERE

Baby math

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Helping your child with homework

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Denis Sheeran (@mathdenisnj) provides us with a very nice list of questions that parents can ask their children while they are working on homework. See the list in our link for today.

Read all about it: HERE

Math and baseball

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

A summer camp in New York City is using the basics of baseball to make math more fun,

Mindfulness

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

TCEA (Texas Computer Education Association) is a global, nonprofit, member-based organization. They support the use of technology in education and they shared these wonderful mindfulness activities.

Read all about it: HERE

Keep them calm

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Easier said than done. Imagine the challenge our teachers have every day. On top of giving their best in educating the children, they also need to make sure the children actually pay attention. Well UKEDCHAT comes to the rescue with some tips to keep the attention.

Read all about it: HERE

Books to help the spatial skills develop

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

We all know by now how important visual spatial skills are for children. They help develop math skills and are a good predictor of any issues with math at an early stage. The good people at KQED list no less than 15 books that may just help with that.

Read all about it: HERE

Preschool Math activities

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

The Development and Research in Early Mathematics Education at Stanford University has a great site filled with activities for preschool math. Wonderful to give the little ones a head start on their later math capabilities.

Read all about it: HERE

Math comes to live online

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Phet has done a great job in providing simulations of important concepts for math and science. These tools are great to incorporate in your interventions with students.

Teachers/tutors and parents can register for free and get an explanation on how to work with the site HERE

Read all about it: HERE

Working on visual spatial skills

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Working with a child on their visual spatial insights and skills is best done with blocks and shapes and sitting next to them. In this day and age that is not always feasible so here is a wonderful alternative, fun and well known, the tangram now online.

Read all about it: HERE

Spatial reasoning in early childhood

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

The Early Childhood Maths group from the UK shares this wonderful guide about spatial reasoning in early childhood so you can read up on how to actually do this with your child.

Read all about it: HERE

Number sense at mealtime

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

The parent page from PBS.org has great recommendations how to turn meal preparation time in the kitchen into a nice motivating activity to boost your child’s number sense.

Read all about it: HERE

Number Sense met Saami games

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Geweldige site , numbershapes met super “Saami” games. Simple fast and helps to recognize numbers. 

Read all about it: HERE

Manage the behaviors

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

If you have worked with students you know that the formula applies: R=Q x A or the result you get is the product of the quality you put in the eduction and the acceptance by the student. Well we trust you for the quality but often the acceptance is not 100% and it shows by unwanted behavior. Via Twitter @RyonWLeyshon shared a model with options of behavior modification strategies for various situations.

Math is everywhere

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

The Development and Research in Mathematics Education network shares a wonderful summary of how you can bring your child to realize that math truly is everywhere around you.

Read all about it: HERE

New use for numicon

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Bernie Westacott made these numicon five boards for his pupils, great idea, now I need someone in etsy to go and produce these….

Mathematical objects in a game

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Listen to the enjoyable podcast about the game quarto.

Read all about it: HERE

Dyscalculia Support in the primary classroom

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Natalie Kerslake from Windmill LEAD Academy in Nottingham explores how she first became interested in supporting children with dyscalculia and maths difficulties, before discussing how they can be supported in the primary classroom.

Read all about it: HERE

Make it stick

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Sometimes your student will be very committed during the intervention you have with them, however to make your messages last even longer in their memory it is good to ask some questions about it where they reflect on what they learned. TeachThought gives us a great lies to get started with it.

Read all about it: HERE

About Executive Function and Self-regulation

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Executive function and self-regulation (EF/SR) skills provide critical supports for learning and development, and while we aren’t born with these skills, we are born with the potential to develop them through interactions and practice.

This 16-page guide (available for download, below), describes a variety of activities and games that represent age-appropriate ways for adults to support and strengthen various components of EF/SR in children.

Each chapter of this guide contains activities suitable for a different age group, from infants to teenagers. The guide may be read in its entirety (which includes the introduction and references) or in discrete sections geared to specific age groups.

Center on the Developing Child at Harvard University (2014). Enhancing and Practicing Executive Function Skills with Children from Infancy to Adolescence. Retrieved from www.developingchild.harvard.edu.

Read all about it: HERE

When language is the problem

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Reading isn’t entirely separate from math. If you can’t read a math problem, you can’t solve it. And even if you can read it—or listen to someone else read it—if you don’t have the vocabulary you need to understand it, you’re also out of luck.

Read all about it: HERE

Learn counting with songs?

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

We are not fond of the rote memory way of learning to count where the children learn 1-10 without understanding what it means, however the video in the link for today shows a great way of how to integrate singing in learning to count with your kid.

Read all about it: HERE