Puzzles are great for Visual Spatial development

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

The Early math collaborative comes with a great suggestions to boost your student’s Visual Spatial capabilities. Do some puzzles, jig saw puzzles. You can use store bought puzzles or make it fun by making one together.

Read all about it: HERE

Open number lines

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Marilyn Burns shares with us her view on open number lines.

She brings up great reasons to try an approach with and open number line:

  • An open number line reinforces the idea that the answer to a subtraction problem is the difference between two numbers.
  • It supports using the inverse relationship between addition and subtraction by counting up instead of back.
  • It engages students in decomposing numbers and reasoning.
  • It provides a visual model that’s a useful tool.

Read all about it: HERE

Work on numeracy

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Corbettmaths has a wonderful site with five questions a day for primary students.

The nice part is that there are various levels of questions to work with and the answers are given too. A great resouce.

Read all about it: HERE

Start the math lesson easy

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Anuska Fitzherbert shares with us some nice ways to start a math lesson. It is important to set the tone for the math lesson and she relates it to the Hindu way of starting something important with a Pooja, a ceremonial prayer for success. Well that is something all students will want to participate in for a math lesson.

She comes up with six nice ways to start the lesson, great reading for our teachers.

Read all about it: HERE

Free board game

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Board games are fun and a great exercise for the youngsters to help them count up and down and skip count.

Many boardgames can help you with that but here is one that you can print out and play, with a Thanksgiving theme around it. Thank you Yourtherapysource.com for sharing that with us. Get the game in the link for today.

Read all about it: HERE

School increases IQ

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Where many people believe that your IQ is pretty much set in stone, a new analysis shows that after a year of school, children’s IQ gets a boost.

A year of schooling leaves students with new knowledge, and it also equates with a small but noticeable increase to students’ IQ, according to a systematic meta-analysis published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

“Our analyses provide the strongest evidence yet that education raises intelligence test scores,” says psychological scientist Stuart J. Ritchie of the University of Edinburgh. “We looked at 42 datasets using several different research designs and found that, overall, adding an extra year of schooling in this way improved people’s IQ scores by between 1 and 5 points.”

https://ukedchat.com/

Read all about it: HERE

Math must be visual

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

One of the great methods to have children learn about math is when they can see it and feel it. You often hear :” They need to get it into their hands before they can get it into their heads”. In this time of remote learning however we can not always sit next to them and use some apples and lemons to make things clear.

So Berkeley Everett helps out and has a whole site with math visuals, great idea and wonderful execution.

Read all about it: HERE

Card games are great for math but, sometimes you need to adjust them a bit.

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

The Erikson Institute, also knows as Early Math Collaborative, sends a great article on how to adjust some popular card games to the skill level of your children. That way you can still have the benefit of the game to help their number sense and you avoid the frustration if they are not able to play the game. The article gives some downloadable sheets on how to do this.

Read all about it: HERE

Handling word problems

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Georgina Rivera @mathcoachrivera shares her strategy for children to handle the word problems and get all information right.

Dyscalculia in the classroom

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Thirdspacelearning.com comes with a great article by Judy Hornigold who explains in a clear way the ins and outs of developmental dyscalculia, the signs and what to do about it.

Great article for a quick overview. Every teacher should see this.

Read all about it: HERE

Games are the new worksheets

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Children love playing games and playing math games will improve their skills. Kristen Reed from edc.org puts it like this:

Math games and puzzles develop children’s problem-solving and independence and foster mastery motivation. Mastery motivation is the motivation to master new, somewhat challenging skills, and it is a key behavior that supports children’s early learning now, and then later, their academic success. By providing children with challenging activities and encouraging them to try different strategies and make their own decisions, teachers and caregivers can foster this important skill.

Read all about it: HERE

Promoting Self-Direction Through Better Feedback

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

When providing feedback both the content and the timing are key:

Every teacher desires students to become their own teachers over time. The idea that students develop self-direction—independent of needing immediate support from teachers—and the ability to solve their own problems is a recurring dream of teachers. But how do we develop independent, self-directed learners when we have so many other demands as educators? Interestingly, one of the most powerful strategies we have at our disposal to build student independence in their learning is through our approach to feedback

Read all about it: HERE

Innovative Approach to Learning Math in Primary School

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

From China we bring you this story about a novel way of teaching and learning math.


At Nanjing International School, learning looks different than what you would find at traditional schools in China and abroad. One of the areas where this is most evident is Maths in Primary School, where we take a leading-edge, inquiry-based approach. Why is this? A growing body of research on how children successfully learn mathematics shows that every student must become an active learner that investigates and explores, often as part of a team.

Read all about it: HERE

Teachers and Parents need to talk

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Working with learning disabled children is a team work. Both parents and teachers are part of that team.

See the story in our link for today for some tips on how to improve the communication.

How can these two groups develop better strategies and avenues for effective communication? That’s the central question we invited our Twitter followers to answer during a Twitter chat last month. We tapped Michelle Lassiter, an Editorial Research and Expert Relations Associate for Understood, a nonprofit that is dedicated to helping those who learn and think differently, to co-host the online discussion and provide her expert insights and resources.

Read all about it: HERE

How to spot dyscalculia in early childhood

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Researchers seem to have found the place where to look for dyscalculia, here is their abstract:

Mathematical learning deficits are defined as a neurodevelopmental disorder (dyscalculia) in the International Classification of Diseases. It is not known, however, how such deficits emerge in the course of early brain development. Here, we conducted functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments in 3- to 6-year-old children without formal mathematical learning experience. We followed this sample until the age of 7 to 9 years, identified individuals who developed deficits, and matched them to a typically developing control group using comprehensive behavioral assessments. Multivariate pattern classification distinguished future cases from controls with up to 87% accuracy based on the regional functional activity of the right posterior parietal cortex (PPC), the network-level functional activity of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and the effective functional and structural connectivity of these regions. Our results indicate that mathematical learning deficits originate from atypical development of a frontoparietal network that is already detectable in early childhood.


Ulrike Kuhl,
Sarah Sobotta,
Legascreen Consortium ,
Michael A. Skeide 

Read all about it: HERE

Check for understanding

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Teaching is a two way street. You can be the best teacher ever but if your brilliant messages are not understood by your audience, you will not get the results you were aiming for.

simply asking ‘have you understood?’ This tells us almost nothing – as students rarely so no or could be wrong in saying yes. But, most importantly, there are always degrees of understanding. Instead of asking if, we should ask what student have understood. Rosenshine gives us a nice list of ways teachers can check for understanding.:

Read all about it: HERE

The power of expectations

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Expectations of teachers from their pupils have a huge impact on the development of the pupils. UKEDchat has the full story about it.

Read all about it: HERE

Supporting pre-term birth children in math

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Check out this whole page with resources to help children who are born pre-term and have difficulties with Math.

Read all about it: HERE

Visual math

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

New research is presented on the page from Stanford by youcubed from Jo Boaler and it all shows how visual math can be.

our brain wants to think visually about maths. Building students’ mathematical understanding doesn’t just mean strengthening one area of the brain that is involved with abstract numbers, it means strengthening connections between areas of the brain and strengthening the visual pathways.

Read all about it: HERE

Halloween Math

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

The conversation blog has a wonderful story about activities that you can do with a Halloween theme and that will help your little ones, see that math is everywhere around them.
Happy Math Halloween, thank you theconversation.com

Read all about it: HERE

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Engagement is key

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

As we always emphasize in our golden rules for dyscalculia interventions, you need to move in the student’s pace and make sure they are with you. The Edtech magazine gives some options for interactive tech tools that may help that engagement.

Read all about it: HERE

Rapper with learning disabilities

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Yes even a awarded rapper has a history of learning disabilities, his words:

“I was born dyslexic so even when I was 10 years old, I couldn’t say my ABC or my 123. My father was so troubled that he is very smart but his son is not smart. They were not able to diagnose that it was dyslexia and dyscalculics so they became very afraid that I would grow up and become nothing”

Read all about it: HERE

How your eyes detect quantities

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

New research from the University of Sydney sheds light on how we perceive objects and know how many there are:

“Result shows that numerical information is intrinsically related to perception,” said Dr Elisa Castaldi from Florence University. “This could have important, practical implications. For example, this ability is compromised in dyscalculia which is a dysfunction in mathematical learning, so our experiment may be useful in early identification of this condition in very young children. It is very simple: subjects simply look at a screen without making any active response, and their pupillary response is measured remotely.”

Read all about it: HERE

Understanding various learning disabilities

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Learning disabilities such as dyslexia, dyscalculia, dysgraphia and attention deficit hyperactivity disorder can frustrate students, confound parents and challenge educators. But all are treatable once they have been detected and diagnosed.

Learning disabilities do not indicate intelligence, nor do they spring from emotional disturbances, physical challenges or poverty. Rather, learning differences result from the way a person’s brain is wired to process information and make connections. They are common, neurobiological in origin and often inherited from a parent.

Read all about it: HERE

‘Groupitizing’

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

‘Groupitizing’ refers to the observation that visually grouped arrays can be accurately enumerated much faster than can unstructured arrays. Previous research suggests that visual grouping allows participants to draw on arithmetic abilities and possibly use mental calculations to enumerate grouped arrays quickly and accurately. Here, we address how subitizing might be involved in finding the operands for mental calculations in grouped dot arrays. We investigated whether participants can use multiple subitizing processes to enumerate both the number of dots and the number of groups in a grouped array. We found that these multiple subitizing processes can take place within 150 ms and that dots and groups seem to be subitized in parallel and with equal priority. Implications for research on mechanisms of groupitizing are discussed.

Read all about it: HERE

Building fluency but with improved cards

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Building fluency in multiplication is important but the old fashioned flash cards are not the way to go. So here is a link to two free sets of improved cards to use with your student. One uses subitizing and the other set uses arrays to make things clear for them.

Read all about it: HERE

The power of estimation

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Estimation is a critical skill. We use it every day. When you pay your monthly bills you probably do not add them up to the last penny but rather round them and estimate if you have enough money in your bank account. When you make a roadtrip you estimate how much gas you’ll need and when you go to the grocery store you estimate how much money you’ll nee. So today we link to a good article from Thomas Courtney on Edutopia with strategies to teach students this important skill.

Read all about it: HERE

An overview of Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

With such a lack of awareness about dyscalculia it seemed a good idea to link to a wonderful paper, written by Matthew Thomas Michaelson from the Queensland University of Technology, that gives a great overview where he defines dyscalculia, considers
the origins of dyscalculia in psychological, biological, and pedagogical
contexts, describes the criteria required to diagnose students with dyscalculia, and delineates practical methods and instructional designs that can
be implemented in the classroom to address the specific learning needs of
dyscalculic learners

Read all about it: HERE

How Children Learn about Numbers

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

See the wonderful explanation from Kelly Mix, here is a quote:

The thing about number is it’s fairly difficult to “see.” Think about trying to explain to a visitor from space what we mean by “two.” You might point to two mittens, two cookies, and two trees, saying “these are all two.” This is a good approach, but there is so much detail and information in each of these kinds of objects, that it’s hard to focus on the quantity. Partly that’s because the “two-ness” is held by the sets of things, rather than by the things themselves; each mitten by itself is not “two.”

Read all about it: HERE