How do we learn?

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Another very useful contribution that EfraFurst makes about how we learn. Three different models are presented. Great site to explore

Read all about it: HERE

About memory

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Memory is such an important part of doing math so we are grateful for the wonderful explanation by EfraFurst about all the ins and outs of our memory and how it all works.

Read all about it: HERE

Working memory and how it developed

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Good research showing where theories about working memory are rooted in research.

Read all about it: HERE

Graphic organizers

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Children with Dyscalculia can benefit greatly from the use of graphic organizers. Research shows that graphic organizers are a useful strategy for gifted and talented and special education populations, but really, all students can benefit from the multimodal learning that graphic organizers support. Graphic organizers are highly versatile. Students can draw them, digitize them, or adapt a teacher-designed template. 

Read all about it: HERE

Spatial skills important for a stem future

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Research has confirmed that spatial skills are a great predictor for later math or stem achievements. PBS has been so kind to devote a whole page to some methods on how to get the children engaged and working on spatial skill development.

Read all about it: HERE

Working memory and Numeracy training for children

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

New research has been performed to see if computerized training of working memory and numeracy would increase the math achievement for children.

The short of the results shows that combining the numeracy training and the working memory trainining probably is worth pursuing.

Read all about it: HERE

More research in what causes Math Anxiety

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

This new research found that spatially structuring the verbal mind is a promising cognitive correlate of the math anxiety and opens new avenues for exploring causal links between elementary cognitive processes and the math anxiety. What all of that means, you can read in the link for today below.

Read all about it: HERE

Teachers can cause math anxiety which caused math achievement to go down

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

In short the research tells us that higher math anxiety predicts lower math achievement and when the researchers looked at what is contributing to the math anxiety, they found that the student’s perception of the capability of the math teachers can create math anxiety. In the words of the researchers as follows:

To better understand the contextual factors underpinning maths anxiety, Lau and colleagues analysed data from 1,175,515 students who participated in three large international studies of achievement. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that students in countries with higher levels of maths anxiety tend to achieve lower maths grades.

The strongest predictor of maths anxiety was how competent students perceived their maths teacher to be: those with less confidence in their teacher tended to feel more anxious. Being set large amounts of maths homework, and parental involvement in homework, also contributed to anxiety to a lesser degree.

Read all about it: HERE

Diving deeper in neural representation of concepts

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

New research used functional MRI to analyze patterns of brain activity corresponding to hundreds of familiar concepts and quantitatively characterized the informational structure of these patterns. The results indicate that conceptual knowledge is stored as patterns of neural activity that encode sensory-motor and affective information about each concept, contrary to the long-held idea that concept representations are independent of sensory-motor experience.

Read all about it: HERE

The Arabic numerals are key

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

New research here showed that from all the numeracy you do with the children at home, the Arabic numerals seem to have the most impact on the development of their artithmatic skills.

Read all about it: HERE

Boys and girls share similar math abilities at young ages

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

There has been much speculation about whether lower female participation rates in STEM fields can be traced to an innate male superiority in math and science. But a new University of Chicago study wanted to test whether boys and girls actually show different mathematical abilities at their earliest developmental stages.

SPOILER ALERT: The researchers found no major differences in numerical processing between genders, noting “these findings indicate that boys and girls are equally equipped to reason about mathematics during early childhood.”

Read all about it: HERE

What is numeracy ?

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

All agree that numeracy is a solid predictor for later arithmatic skills however, there is no real consensus about what factors contribute to this or what that numeracy now really is. New research here looked at a number of published research articles on the topic and came with interesting points.

Read all about it: HERE

Spatial cognition and Math

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

A massive psychology study has found that spatial cognition training can enhance children’s math learning

Read all about it: HERE

Mother’s education is important

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Great research here about the cognitive development of children coming into Kindergarten and their development in math and reading. It suggests that the mother’s education level is a factor more than social economic status when entering KG and the development thereafter.

Read all about it: HERE

Precursor Math Concepts

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

The Early Math Collaborative has a great page explaining the notion of Precursor Math Concepts.

Just as the foundation of a building anchors it in the earth and provides essential support for the growing structure, in the first three years of life children engage in a very fundamental way with concepts that anchor a child’s mathematical thinking and are essential for the growth of further mathematics.

Read all about it: HERE or read the new book Precursor Math Concepts

Build-A-Train

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Great research done by H Moriah Sokolowski 1 2Rebecca Merkley 3Sarah Samantha Bray Kingissepp 2Praja Vaikuntharajan 2Daniel Ansari 2

The ‘Build-A-Train’ task was developed and used to examine whether children spontaneously use a number or physical size approach on an un-cued matching task. In the Build-A-Train task, an experimenter assembles a train using one to five blocks of a particular length and asks the child to build the same train. The child’s blocks differ in length from the experimenter’s blocks, causing the child to build a train that matches based on either the number of blocks or length of the train, as it is not possible to match on both. 

The Build-A-Train task and findings from this current study set a foundation for future longitudinal research to investigate the causal relationship between children’s acquisition of symbolic mathematical concepts and attention to number.

Read all about it: HERE

Life can be difficult for our kids

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Children’s mental health and well-being are tied to their achievement in school. For elementary and middle school students, the classroom can be an overwhelming environment that may cause social pressure and performance anxiety.

As a result, mental health interventions are often needed to help address adverse effects, particularly for students of color who face the additional threat of negative stereotypes and biases about their ability to succeed academically, some experts say.

See the article in the link for today to find five ways to help your kids.

Read all about it: HERE

Finding the subitizing in groupitizing

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

‘Groupitizing’ refers to the observation that visually grouped arrays can be accurately enumerated much faster than can unstructured arrays. Previous research suggests that visual grouping allows participants to draw on arithmetic abilities and possibly use mental calculations to enumerate grouped arrays quickly and accurately. Here, we address how subitizing might be involved in finding the operands for mental calculations in grouped dot arrays. We investigated whether participants can use multiple subitizing processes to enumerate both the number of dots and the number of groups in a grouped array. We found that these multiple subitizing processes can take place within 150 ms and that dots and groups seem to be subitized in parallel and with equal priority. Implications for research on mechanisms of groupitizing are discussed.

Read all about it: HERE

Executive function and Dyscalculia

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

At the Ghent university in Belgium, they are planning a rather interesting project. They will review the relationship of executive function and dyscalculia. Here is what they say about it:

Project description

Dyslexia and dyscalculia are learning disorders with a high prevelance. They correlate strongly. A possible explanation can be found in the hypothesis of deficits in executive functioning. Therefore, this research maps out the profiles of executive functions. This is done by use of a comparative study existing of four groups: dyslexia, dyscalculia, a comorbid and a control group.

Read all about it: HERE

You will need your focus and memory

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Who would have thought that the food you eat will impact your focus and memory? My mom would always tell me to drink milk before a test as it would help my memory but here is a nutritionist from Harvard University with some foods to avoid so you’ll maintain your focus and memory.

Read all about it: HERE

The importance of math in the early years.

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

In the last decade, educators have focused on boosting literacy skills among low-income kids in the hope that all children will read well by third grade. But the early-grade math skills of these same low-income children have not received equal attention. Researchers say many high-poverty kindergarten classrooms don’t teach enough math and the few lessons on the subject are often too basic. While instruction may challenge kids with no previous exposure to math, it is often not engaging enough for the growing number of kindergarteners with some math skills.

Read all about it: HERE

School increases IQ

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Where many people believe that your IQ is pretty much set in stone, a new analysis shows that after a year of school, children’s IQ gets a boost.

A year of schooling leaves students with new knowledge, and it also equates with a small but noticeable increase to students’ IQ, according to a systematic meta-analysis published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science.

“Our analyses provide the strongest evidence yet that education raises intelligence test scores,” says psychological scientist Stuart J. Ritchie of the University of Edinburgh. “We looked at 42 datasets using several different research designs and found that, overall, adding an extra year of schooling in this way improved people’s IQ scores by between 1 and 5 points.”

https://ukedchat.com/

Read all about it: HERE

How to spot dyscalculia in early childhood

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Researchers seem to have found the place where to look for dyscalculia, here is their abstract:

Mathematical learning deficits are defined as a neurodevelopmental disorder (dyscalculia) in the International Classification of Diseases. It is not known, however, how such deficits emerge in the course of early brain development. Here, we conducted functional and structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) experiments in 3- to 6-year-old children without formal mathematical learning experience. We followed this sample until the age of 7 to 9 years, identified individuals who developed deficits, and matched them to a typically developing control group using comprehensive behavioral assessments. Multivariate pattern classification distinguished future cases from controls with up to 87% accuracy based on the regional functional activity of the right posterior parietal cortex (PPC), the network-level functional activity of the right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC), and the effective functional and structural connectivity of these regions. Our results indicate that mathematical learning deficits originate from atypical development of a frontoparietal network that is already detectable in early childhood.


Ulrike Kuhl,
Sarah Sobotta,
Legascreen Consortium ,
Michael A. Skeide 

Read all about it: HERE

Check for understanding

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Teaching is a two way street. You can be the best teacher ever but if your brilliant messages are not understood by your audience, you will not get the results you were aiming for.

simply asking ‘have you understood?’ This tells us almost nothing – as students rarely so no or could be wrong in saying yes. But, most importantly, there are always degrees of understanding. Instead of asking if, we should ask what student have understood. Rosenshine gives us a nice list of ways teachers can check for understanding.:

Read all about it: HERE

Visual math

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

New research is presented on the page from Stanford by youcubed from Jo Boaler and it all shows how visual math can be.

our brain wants to think visually about maths. Building students’ mathematical understanding doesn’t just mean strengthening one area of the brain that is involved with abstract numbers, it means strengthening connections between areas of the brain and strengthening the visual pathways.

Read all about it: HERE

How your eyes detect quantities

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

New research from the University of Sydney sheds light on how we perceive objects and know how many there are:

“Result shows that numerical information is intrinsically related to perception,” said Dr Elisa Castaldi from Florence University. “This could have important, practical implications. For example, this ability is compromised in dyscalculia which is a dysfunction in mathematical learning, so our experiment may be useful in early identification of this condition in very young children. It is very simple: subjects simply look at a screen without making any active response, and their pupillary response is measured remotely.”

Read all about it: HERE

‘Groupitizing’

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

‘Groupitizing’ refers to the observation that visually grouped arrays can be accurately enumerated much faster than can unstructured arrays. Previous research suggests that visual grouping allows participants to draw on arithmetic abilities and possibly use mental calculations to enumerate grouped arrays quickly and accurately. Here, we address how subitizing might be involved in finding the operands for mental calculations in grouped dot arrays. We investigated whether participants can use multiple subitizing processes to enumerate both the number of dots and the number of groups in a grouped array. We found that these multiple subitizing processes can take place within 150 ms and that dots and groups seem to be subitized in parallel and with equal priority. Implications for research on mechanisms of groupitizing are discussed.

Read all about it: HERE

How Children Learn about Numbers

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

See the wonderful explanation from Kelly Mix, here is a quote:

The thing about number is it’s fairly difficult to “see.” Think about trying to explain to a visitor from space what we mean by “two.” You might point to two mittens, two cookies, and two trees, saying “these are all two.” This is a good approach, but there is so much detail and information in each of these kinds of objects, that it’s hard to focus on the quantity. Partly that’s because the “two-ness” is held by the sets of things, rather than by the things themselves; each mitten by itself is not “two.”

Read all about it: HERE