Help your anxious child

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

The teacher’s toolkit comes with a great short article to support parents who want to help their anxious child. It is heartbreaking to see children with anxiety and their learning is severely impacted by it. When parents follow these tips there may be some improvement, it is worth the read.

Read all about it: HERE

Math Anxiety research

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

A new paper explores, among many other things, discussion of the prevalence of MA and the need for establishing external criteria for estimating prevalence and a proposal for such criteria; exploration of the effects of MA in different groups, such as highly anxious and high math–performing individuals; classroom and policy applications of MA knowledge; the effects of MA outside educational settings; and the consequences of MA on mental health and well-being.

Read all about it: HERE

Math anxiety on a global scale

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

Using three large-scale international assessments of student achievement, the current study examined the antecedents of math anxiety and the relation between math anxiety and math achievement across the globe. Results suggest that individual math anxiety is negatively associated with math achievement across the globe. Importantly, we uncovered a contextual effect of math anxiety where the level of math anxiety in one’s educational peer group predicts math achievement above and beyond what could be predicted by one’s own math anxiety. Further, there is significant between-country variability in this contextual effect—only half of the examined countries’ contextual effect was statistically significant. Our results reveal an effect of educational peer’s math anxiety on math achievement and reinforce extant research findings.

Read all about it: HERE

More research in what causes Math Anxiety

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

This new research found that spatially structuring the verbal mind is a promising cognitive correlate of the math anxiety and opens new avenues for exploring causal links between elementary cognitive processes and the math anxiety. What all of that means, you can read in the link for today below.

Read all about it: HERE

Teachers can cause math anxiety which caused math achievement to go down

Dyscalculia: News from the web:

In short the research tells us that higher math anxiety predicts lower math achievement and when the researchers looked at what is contributing to the math anxiety, they found that the student’s perception of the capability of the math teachers can create math anxiety. In the words of the researchers as follows:

To better understand the contextual factors underpinning maths anxiety, Lau and colleagues analysed data from 1,175,515 students who participated in three large international studies of achievement. The study, published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that students in countries with higher levels of maths anxiety tend to achieve lower maths grades.

The strongest predictor of maths anxiety was how competent students perceived their maths teacher to be: those with less confidence in their teacher tended to feel more anxious. Being set large amounts of maths homework, and parental involvement in homework, also contributed to anxiety to a lesser degree.

Read all about it: HERE